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Tips by David  

   

 
Colder months aproaching..

As we approach the colder months, one may want to take in consideration of getting your birdie friends a snuggly,a tent or a thermo perch each of these items will aide in the warmth of our feathered friends especially in the evenings.

Also be aware of spritzing your bird or a shower. DO NOT wet your bird after 12 noon as they need the better part of a day to dry out...Showers or bathing should be done prior to 10am in the winter months...try to towel dry a bit to aide in the bird getting dryer faster....



 
Bird Cage Cleaning

HERE's THE BEST BIRDIE CARE HINT YET! I've owned birds all my life, and just recently tried something new, that has made cage cleaning SO MUCH EASIER! Everyone run, quickly to your cage! Look at your cage's design and determine if the grid can be removed WITHOUT allowing the bird to then fit between the cage and the tray.

If your cage is so designed, that the bird cannot get out without the grid in the cage, then here's the tricky part: Do you have a bird that stays above his lowest perch? Doesn't go to the bottom of the cage to pick things up or try to tear up the paper? Then you are in business with this hint!

Pull that grid out now! It serves no purpose if your bird doesn't go to the bottom of his cage! It's just one more very difficult thing to keep clean! Some cages, (Island Cages) can even fit the grid under the cage, between the legs, and it will act as a shelf for you to keep things on! David and I have both done this with our Amazons and it works perfectly! (Can't do it with my Cockatoo, because he's at the bottom getting into everything!) Take a look at your cage, see if it works for you!



 
Pet Bird Behavior and Breeding Season

Many of you who own birds may be saying to yourself in the upcoming weeks, "What is going on?" It's breeding season! The days are getting longer, and more sunshine is telling our beloved pets that it's that time of year again!

I've noticed my Goffin's Cockatoo acting like a teenage boy this week, and it's sometimes hard to deal with, but there is advise out there. Don't encourage breeding behavior in your bird. When you pet him, stay around his head, never stroke him all the way down to his tail. If he or she exhibits things you don't care for, ie: regurgitating on you or rubbing against you, quickly put them back in their cage and try to convey that their behavior is not acceptable so they go back in their cage when they do it.

But above all, try to remember that they are birds, and we must let birds be birds sometimes. That means perhaps having to just deal as best we can with screaming, a bite now and then, and even breeding season! Love them for what they are, and know that "this too shall pass"!



 
Items you should NEVER feed your Parrot or Exotic

Although it is a pretty short list, it is important to never feed your bird these things if you want it to live a happy long life.

Salty Food
Processed Food
Avocados
Caffeine
Candy or Sweet Sugary Items
Fried Food
Garlic/Onions
Rhubarb
Uncooked or Undercooked Eggs
Uncooked or Undercooked Meat
Milk (birds cannot process lactose)
Alcohol (yes, sadly we have to tell people this as if it isn't obvious)



 
Plants that can Harm your Parrot

The following list is not all inclusive, but a group of plants that parrots may come in contact with because they are common in and around our homes. When in doubt, check with your avian vet or local nursery or botanist.

Amaryllis Azalea
Black Locust Boxwood
Calla Lilly Caladium
Castor Bean Cherry Tree
Daffodil Delphinium
Dieffenbachia Holly
Hydrangea Iris
Ivy Lantana
Lily of the Valley Lobelia
Morning Glory Oleander
Poinsettia Privet
Rhododendron Rhubarb
Sweet Pea Wisteria
Yews